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The Medical Profession
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 07:23:27 -0700
Newsgroups: alt.support.impotence
Size: 5,825 bytes


"Rich" <email-address-deleted> wrote in message
news:ZFXIa.33702$email-address-deleted...

> Do NOT expect any help from "doctors". The MD degree
> is overrated. 98% of "doctors" have only 2 years of classroom
> education in chemistry and/or biology. The so called "doctors"
> can't help you and won't help you, even if their lives were
> depended on it. They're bored, disinterested, depressed,
> apathetic and sick like most of us.


I had to chuckle when I read this. Here at ASI we've been rather charitable
in our assessment of the medical profession. Making such statements as:
"Many don't keep up with the newer procedures." "Some have other biases."
But I believe your statement rings truer.

When I had my 'terminal erection' it was because the doctor actually never
saw me until I was in real trouble. It was a Physician Assistant (PA) that
was seeing me. When I took a physical for government employment, it was a PA
that did the actually physical; then the doctor, in another room, signed the
form. These lazy doctors and their money-grubbing HMOs are at fault.

I didn't know what a PA was until I sent to see a doctor, was being treated,
then noticed the plaque on his desk had his name followed by "PA." I asked
what PA meant and he told me it was, "like an assistant doctor." That their
trained in specialized fields. When I asked what the educational
requirements was for PA, he was vague and avoiding of further questions.

I was pissed. I said I was paying for this service. That if some bum walking
off the street could see a real doctor for free, I expected to see one
because I was paying. This young PA said he understood completely. We walked
up to the reception area and made me an appointment with a doctor. (I was
wondering why I was able to get a Same Day Appointment).

I've seen four PAs since that first time. The first misdiagnosed me. The
second overdosed me (the 8-hour erection). The third couldn't speak
understandable English. He asked what prescription I wanted and quite
literally was going to write me a prescription for something other than what
I needed. I had to point to my empty bottle to get him to write the script.
Then I told the druggist I was concerned and had a consultation with him
about what I was taking and why.

When I went to an emergency room to have some stitches in my tongue, I
questioned if the 'doctor' was actually a doctor. I was told there was a PA
available now, or I could wait for a doctor. I said I would wait. After
twenty minutes they sent me in. I found out later it was the PA anyway
because they published a story about him later having been a battlefield
medic, working in combat areas, in some third-world country's war. This jerk
put on gloves, examined my tongue and decided I needed stitches. He handled
every drawer and cabinet in the room, obviously unaware of where anything
was, then handled the doorknobs on both sides leaving the room to find what
he needed. Who know what he handled while gone. Then went to grab my tongue
with the same gloved hand.

Kaiser Permanente, a medical group I was in, started using PAs. I refused to
see one or accept one as my "Personal Physician." My next door neighbor in
Washington State was a PA. He was allowed to write prescriptions. I asked
him what the educational requirements were. He, too, was evasive in
replying. What I was able to glean was that they're required to take special
college classes for "about two years."

What bull shit. The medical profession is lazy and greedy. They fight to
prevent additional doctor schools. They're lazy and tire of repetitive
procedures, like giving physicals, and pawn off the 'boring' or mundane
duties. I found that my HMO in Washington State (Kaiser) had told their
doctor to increase their "Patients Per Day" to 110 from 90. Some of the
senior doctor fought that. Mine was one. But the pressure and intent is
there, none-the-less. And you have to make your own fight.

I had one doctor that would come into the room, and right away was backing
toward the door; open it and was talking as she was backing out. I finally
asked one time: "I have some questions. Should I wait until you come back?"

Because of constant back pain I was prescribed to go to Kasier's Physical
Therapy to try a number of procedures. When I tried to sign in, I was told
they were booked and wouldn't have an opening for two months. "Try again in
a couple of months." I was incensed. I went right back down the hall to my
doctor's office and demanded to see the doctor again. He walked down to
Physical Therapy and demanded I be entered; that I couldn't be expected to
wait months while in pain. I have other Kaiser horror stories, but you get
the idea.

I have a good doctor now (he's Chief of Staff of the hospital connected to
physician offices). It's become a joke in the office (five other doctors)
about my carrying a copy of my own medical records. (it's an abbreviated
record I keep on my computer and print out to take with me. About 12 pages).
He or his nurse will go to look something up, like a previous operation, and
I'll often find it faster in my records. And I carry a sheet with my
questions already written out so I don't forget to ask him something.

The point being: it's up to us to demand the services we pay for. And as
this forum has shown, it's up to us to do what we can to understand our own
problems and be a part of our cure by asking questions and questioning
procedures. And understanding the doctor doesn't know it all and inject
statements like, "could you check your books and see what medicine might be
better?" "Can you find out more about that and get back to me?" "Should you
refer me to a specialist on this?"

Sometimes the arrogant need to put in their place. (And I needed to blow off
steam)



Jerry of ASI











 

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